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Prof. Margolis - English 102 - Charlotte Delbo’s “Departure and Return” in Convoy to Auschwitz: Truncation and Wildcards

Truncation and Wildcards

A little about truncation and wildcards...

Truncation and wildcard symbols provide flexibility in searching. Do you want to search for variations of a word that contain the same root or stem? Would you like to perform a search for a word that could have spelling variations? You will learn how to use truncation and wildcard symbols to do both of these things!

 

TRUNCATION

A truncation search allows you to search for variations of a word that share the same stem at the same time. Truncation symbols vary by database, so be sure to consult the help section of the database you are using before conducting such a search. In Academic Search Complete, the truncation symbol is an asterisk (*). Here are some examples of truncation in use along with variations of the word that would be retrieved:

A search for the word challeng* will search for the following keywords: challenges, challenging, challenged

 

WILDCARDS

  A wildcard search allows you to search for words that have variations in spelling (or when you are unsure of the spelling). Wildcard symbols also vary by database, so be sure to consult the help section of the database you are using before conducting such a search. In Academic Search Complete, the wildcard symbol is a question mark (?). Here are some examples of wildcards searches:

A search for the word wom?n will find woman, women.

Or perhaps we want to search for relevance, but can't remember if it is spelled "relevance" or "relevence" We can search for relev?nce and articles or records containing the word will be retrieved.

 
 
 
 

 

         
         
         
         
         
         
     
     
     
     
 
 

Other Helpful Pages

  • Truncation & Wildcard Tutorial
    This is an interactive tutorial from the University of Colorado that demonstrates how to use these advanced search techniques.
  • Wildcards & Truncation in EBSCO
    This help page is provided by EBSCO, the company behind Academic Search Complete and many other databases.
  • Truncation & Wildcard Quick Reference
    This PDF from Creighton University gives great examples of how truncation and wildcard operators are used. It also lists a number of database providers and the appropriate symbols to use in each.