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PSYCH 101 - General Psychology - Palmieri: Presentation Tips and Help

This guide will help Professor Palmieri's students locate and evaluate authoritative resources for their term paper projects.

Overcoming Anxiety

Know your fears - make a list of those things that make you feel anxious or fearful, then make another list with all of the ways you can deal with those fears.

Take Deep Breathes - when you practice your speech, also practice taking deep, slow breathes.  This will help you calm down and speak more clearly.

Practice, Practice, Practice - practicing what you will say will help you feel prepared and confident before your speech.

Imagine Yourself Succeeding - what would a successful speech look like for you?  Create a mental picture and practice to achieve that visualization.

Scope Out the Space - take a look at where you will be speaking ahead of time, learn as many details as possible: will you be on a stage?, behind a podium?, is there a clock?, what is the technology like?

Exercise to Calm Down - take a quick walk, stretch, or climb stairs to reduce any pre-speech jitters and burn off excess nervous energy.

Take Care of Yourself - get a good night's sleep and eat a healthy meal before your speech.  Follow any normal routines before the speech.  Avoid coffee if you tend to get anxious.  

Don't Be Focused on "Perfect" - there is no such thing as the perfect speech, since there is always room to improve.  Look at any mistakes you make as opportunities for improvement in the future.

Common Public Speaking Fears

The technology will not work 

There is a good chance this may happen, but if you prepare alternatives ahead of time you will be able to deal with any setback.  Bring handouts, save your presentation to a portable drive, or you could even find an overhead projector.  The key, though, is to have a good speech memorized that is just as effective without visuals.


The audience is uninterested or dislikes me.

Almost always the audience wants to see you be successful.  Though some audience members may come across as abrupt or unfriendly, it may not be at all related to your speech skills


I can't come up with an interesting topic

Each person has a unique perspective on the world with valuable information to present.  If you choose a topic that interests and excites you, that enthusiasm will come across as you talk about the topic and will engage the audience.  You can also craft the speech to be more relevant to your audience, using examples they can relate to, which will keep their attention.


I'll forget everything in the speech

The best way to counteract forgetting parts of your speech is to practice.  And practice.  And practice more.  Once you have the speech outline memorized, you'll be able to deal with any moments when you get lost or diverted in the delivery.  If you do get stuck - stop, breath, take a moment to look over your notes, and continue.


I can't keep track of time while speaking and I'll finish too early or too late.

Again, practice.  The only way to meet the requirements of the speech is to practice thoroughly.


 

 I get nervous in front of a group and talk too quickly or quietly.

Talking too quickly or quietly can be a problem in front of a group.  If you breathe deeply you will minimize your anxiety and better prepare yourself to speak loudly and clearly.  Try practicing in a large room and projecting your voice to the very back.  Remember to add pauses or moments of silence in your speech, which can be effective tools to emphasize a point.

Guidelines for Presentation

Class presentation is a brief summary of your topic, interesting research and thoughts on the topic. Multi-media presentations and creativity are encouraged.

 

 Images: A reader should not have to refer to the text to understand the image. Explanatory text should include title, owner/artist and where the image is stored. In APA you must provide a copyright attribution in addition to citing item when you reproduce it in the body of your work.

Presentation Tips

One double-spaced page takes about two minutes to read aloud (but you should not read word-for-word from your paper!).

A five minute speech would equal about 2 1/2 pages of typed text.

A ppt presentation to accompany a five minute speech should have a maximum of 5 slides.


Remember that your listeners will not have a references to see where your information comes from. Be sure to give them that information in your speech - you do not need to recite article titles and page numbers, but let them know the information you are giving them is from an authoritative source.

For example:

A 2013 Pew Research poll showed that although 69% of of U.S. adults surveyed felt that the obesity problem in the U.S. was either' Extremely' or 'Very Serious,' only 42% felt that the government should play a significant role in reducing obesity.

According to a 2014 study by researchers at Boston University Medical Center only 40% of college football players could recall being given information on concussions by their athletic trainer although all had acknowledged receipt of such information earlier in the season.

Speech Writing Help