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Prof. Vecchio - 19th Century U.S. History: What is a Scholarly Source?

How Can You Tell if a Source is "Scholarly"?

 

Scholarly Sources

Audience

Scholars, researchers, practitioners

Authors

Experts in the field (i.e., faculty members, researchers)

Articles are signed, often including author's credentials and affiliation

Footnotes

Includes a bibliography, references, notes and/or works cited section

Editors

Editorial board of outside scholars (known as peer review)

Publishers

Often a scholarly or professional organization or academic press

Writing Style

Assumes a level of knowledge in the field

Usually contains specialized language (jargon)

Articles are often lengthy

General Characteristics

Primarily print with few pictures

Tables, graphs, and diagrams are often included

Usually few or no advertisements

Often have "journal," "review," or "quarterly" as part of the title

Usually have a narrow subject focus